Norton Abrasives

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 Grinding Wheels  Flap Wheels  Flap Disc  Norton Belts
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 Cut_Off Wheels  Small Cut-Off Wheels  Cartridge Rolls  Quick Change Disc
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 Blaze Fibre Disc  Blaze Cartridge Rolls  Norton File Belts  Norton PSA Disc

Weekly Featured Blog

Posted by on Nov 6, 2013 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

Weekly Featured Blog

Flexible http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/viagras shank Carbide Burrs are best suited to castings in areas that are difficult to reach with standard or long shank burrs. Available in all shapes and lengths. Available in 6″, 12″ & 18″ Lengths Click here to learn more or https://www.levitradosageus24.com/levitra-20mg-buy-price/ to order...

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All About Abrasives

Posted by on Jun 25, 2013 in All About Abrasives | 0 comments

All About Abrasives

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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All About Burrs

Posted by on Sep 5, 2008 in All About Burrs, Blog | 0 comments

All About Burrs

All About Burrs Beau Beadel Carbide Tools for Industry, Inc. ABSTRACT Carbide Tools for Industry, Inc. (CTI) circa 1955 features a wide variety of the finest quality Carbide Burrs made of premium micro grain carbide and carefully ground on state of the art 5-axis computer numerical control (CNC) tool grinders. Carbide burrs and rotary files are used in various applications for deburring, cylinder head porting, mold making, tool and die, metalworking, tool grinding, foundry, aerospace, automotive, dental laboratory, wood carving, farriers, metal smithing, sculpting, welding, chamfering, jewelry manufacturing, die casting, and metal casting. The purpose of the research is to define burrs (rotary file), describe the chemical composition, the history of tool making, the uses/applications and what the future holds for carbide burrs. INTRODUCTION Burrs which are also known as rotary files which consist of small and large shaped cutters used in die grinders, rotary tools, and dentist�s drills.  The name may be considered suitable when their mini-size head (3 mm diameter shaft) is closely similar to that of a seed in the burr fruit.  Carbide burrs are also used in CNC machining robot �type� centers for removing burrs (the small flakes of metal) after a machining process (Burrs-cutting, n.d.) To sustain the right external speed and cutting environment they are rotated at the maximum velocity achievable, appropriate with their size and structure. In engineering, a burr can be described as the raised circumference on metal. It may be present in the form of a fine wire on the edge of a freshly sharpened tool or as a raised portion on a surface, after being struck a blow from an equally hard or heavy object. Specifically, burrs are as a rule useless residual that is the effect after machine grinding, drilling, milling, or turning.  In the following report the word, burr, refers to the excess substance of material and carbide burr refers to the tool that removes the excess material. Deburring The process of removing burrs, the small flakes of metal, is known as deburring. Burr creation in machining accounts for a major part of the costs for manufacturers throughout the world. Drilling burrs, for example, are common when drilling almost any material. The Boeing 747 airplane has approximately 1.3 million holes drilled in it most of which have to be deburred to some extent (Burrs-metal, April 2007). As one could imagine, the cost and time needed to perform these drilling and deburring operations is significant. In addition to drilling, milling is also a source of burr formation in machining. A good example of unwanted burrs is in the automotive industry where cylinder blocks, pistons and other engine components are cast then milled to a specific dimension. With higher demands placed on accuracy and precision, burr formation is of critical importance because it can affect engine performance, reliability, and durability (Burrs-metal, April 2007). HISTORY Tungsten Carbide & Cobalt Compounds In 1758, the Swedish chemist and mineralogist, Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, discovered and described an unusually heavy mineral that he called “tung-sten”, which is Swedish for heavy stone. (Tungsten history, n.d.) During the 19th century, cobalt blue was produced at the Norwegian Blaafarvevaerket (70-80% of world production), led by the Prussian industrialist Benjamin Wegner. In 1938, John Livingood and Glenn Seaborg discovered cobalt-60 (Cobalt, n.d.). Machine Tools Modern machine tools date...

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